Wednesday, December 31, 2003

Best Recipes of 2003

(hover for a description, click a photo for a recipe)
January - Beef Stew with Cranberries (Swedish Kalops) February - Chicken Cacciatore March - Tiapinno (Ciopinno) - Italian Fish Stew
April - Tender Pork Tenderloin May - Sweet-Corn Soup with Shrimp June - Gingerbread Muffins
July - Parmesan Chicken August - Wild Rice Salad September - Sautéed Red & Yellow Pepper Relish
October - Baked Apples November - At Last! Black Bean Soup December - Holiday Fruit Parfait

More 'Best of the Year' Favorite Recipes from Kitchen Parade


Kitchen Parade is written by second-generation food columnist Alanna Kellogg and features fresh, seasonal dishes for every-day healthful eating and occasional indulgences.

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Friday, December 19, 2003

Recipe for Holiday Fruit Parfait with
Yogurt, Cranberries, Applesauce, Pineapple & Kiwi

Prepare to behold one of the prettiest dishes ever! Imagine jewel-colored layers of cranberry and applesauce, golden pineapple and yogurt lined with iridescent kiwi slices. It does indeed look impressive but is easy as can be to assemble!

This colorful fruit medley was a hit at a holiday brunch last year. “This is really good,” a friend raved. Another friend at first seemed to disagree. “No way,” she said and then continued, “This is really, REALLY good.”

Everyone at the table nodded, surprised at the unusual combination of tart cranberry, sweet fruit and creamy yogurt.

And it looks as good as it tastes! The kiwi shines like exotic green glass against the pale yogurt and ruby-colored cranberry. “No way,” my friend might have responded, “This is really, REALLY beautiful.”

Prepared in advance, the fruit salad is also perfect for Christmas morning, perhaps served with fruity muffins or cinnamon buns. This makes time for a morning twirl around the kitchen, a story-time snuggle beneath a blanket, a moment for contemplation of the all-year blessings of the holidays.

ALANNA's TIPS To make your own applesauce, chop a mix of apple varieties, leaving the peels on; cook until soft with just a bit of water. Pull out your prettiest clear glass bowl and serve tableside for maximum effect. I wish I could promise that the layers 'stay' looking pretty once it's being served, but no. For a small group, individual parfaits might be especially impressive. Purchase the kiwis a few days ahead for additional ripening time. Slice the kiwis quite thin so they’ll more easily adhere to the sides of your bowl. To serve a larger group, add other fruit, perhaps oranges and bananas.

Kitchen Parade is written by second-generation food columnist Alanna Kellogg and features fresh, seasonal dishes for every-day healthful eating and occasional indulgences. Do you have a favorite recipe that other Kitchen Parade readers might like? Just send me a quick e-mail via recipes@kitchen-parade.com. How to print a Kitchen Parade recipe. If you like Kitchen Parade, you're sure to like my food blog about vegetable recipes, too, A Veggie Venture. Become a Kitchen Parade fan on Facebook!

HOLIDAY FRUIT PARFAIT

Hands-on time: 30 minutes Time to table: Minimum 3 hours
Makes 6 cups
  • 1-1/2 cups cranberries (about 6 ounces)
  • 1/3 cup water
  • 3 tablespoons sugar
  • 1-1/2 cups chunky applesauce (see TIPS)
  • 4 - 6 kiwis, peeled, cut in 1/4 inch rounds
  • 1 cup pineapple (fresh if available) cut in 1/2 inch pieces
  • 3 cups low-fat vanilla yogurt
  • 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
  • Additional pineapple, for garnish

Combine cranberries, water and sugar in heavy small saucepan, stirring until sugar dissolves. Bring to a boil over medium heat and cook until berries are soft, about 3 minutes. Reserve 2 tablespoons to use later as topping. Mix applesauce into remaining cranberry mixture. Cover and refrigerate until cold, at least 1 hour.

Arrange kiwi rounds in a single layer on the bottom of a clear glass bowl. Stand remaining kiwis around the bowl’s bottom edge, pressing to adhere to the glass. Spoon cranberry-apple mixture over top, then top with pineapple. Stir yogurt and cinnamon together and pour evenly over fruit. (If the bowl is shallow, one layer works great. If the bowl is tall, such as the trifle bowl in the photograph, two layers work better. For two layers, you may want more pineapple.) Cover and chill at least 1 hour and up to 1 day.

An hour or so before serving, top with reserved cranberry mixture and garnish pineapple.

NUTRITION ESTIMATE Per 1/2 cup serving: 133 Calories; 4g Protein; 1g Tot Fat; 1g Sat Fat; 29g Carb; 3g Fiber; 42mg Sodium; 3mg Cholesterol; Weight Watchers 2 points
Adapted from Bon Appetit, December 2000


A Winter Brunch Menu


More Holiday Brunch Ideas

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Swiss Muesli Eggnog French Toast with Apple Cranberry Compote Bacon & Egg Breakfast Bake

More Fruit Salad Recipes

(hover for a description, click a photo for a recipe)
Winter Fruit Salad Apple Yogurt Salad Grape Salad with Almonds & Cilantro

Shop Your Pantry First

(helping home cooks save money on groceries)





© Copyright 2009 Kitchen Parade



Friday, December 5, 2003

Saturday Soup

What to eat when your fridge is filled with nothing but bits of leftovers? Saturday Soup! It's my family's proven forumula for using up lots of bits of leftovers. It's rarely pretty but it's usually surprisingly tasty – and best of all, food waste drops to nil.

Leftovers for Saturday Soup

Thanksgiving leftovers are the best! But if a week’s gone by and your fridge still holds turkey bounty, chances are, everyone’s ready to move on.

SATURDAY SOUP is a terrific way to use up leftovers all year round. Make it regularly and you’ll find yourself saving tiny bites of leftovers (sometimes in a designated container in the fridge or freezer) that might otherwise go to waste.

As a kid, we threw a batch together for Saturday lunch, cleaning out the fridge before Mom headed to the store to pick up the next week’s groceries. Because the leftovers changed every week, two pots rarely tasted the same, except for being both reliably delicious and completely unrepeatable!

ALANNA's TIPS Bacon meat itself is optional but bacon fat seems to meld all the flavors. Add only enough leftovers as needed for the next meal because leftover Saturday Soup is strictly forbidden! Experiment! Memorable batches have included fruit cocktail and applesauce; one great potful used up leftover sauerkraut and sausage.

SATURDAY SOUP

Hands-on time: 10 minutes
Time to table: 15 – 20 minutes
Serves: You Decide
  • 2 slices bacon, chopped, or about 1 tablespoon bacon fat
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 tablespoon flour
  • 1 cup liquid – skim milk, chicken broth, tomato juice, broth from cubes, etc, heated in microwave
  • Leftover meat, chopped
  • Leftover vegetables, chopped
  • Leftover pasta, rice, fried or mashed potatoes, etc.
  • Leftover fruit, chutney, etc.
  • Salt, pepper, hot sauce, etc.

Sauté the bacon, onion and garlic until soft. Stir in the flour and combine well. Slowly add the hot liquid, stirring to avoid lumps. Add leftover meat, vegetables, starches and other leftovers. Stir until hot, about 5 – 10 minutes since the ingredients are already fully cooked.

Add more liquid as needed for volume and to keep soupy. If you’re short on leftover vegetables, add a can or two. Limit the starches; a little is a lot. Once the soup is hot, taste it and add salt and pepper. If the soup tastes flat, add more garlic, Tabasco or other spices.



Saturday Soup

Saturday Soup is rarely pretty but it is often surprisingly tasty. This batch used up some leftover pulled pork, leftover cooked turkey, leftover Plant Sale Soup and a few shriveled grapes.

Kitchen Parade is written by second-generation food columnist Alanna Kellogg and features fresh, seasonal dishes for every-day healthful eating and occasional indulgences. Do you have a favorite technique for using up leftover that other Kitchen Parade readers might like? Just send me a quick e-mail via recipes@kitchen-parade.com.

How Do You use Up Leftovers?

Too often, leftovers just languish in the fridge, then we throw them away. So if you've got a tip for how to successfully manage leftovers, share it with other Kitchen Parade readers in the comments. I'd love to know your ideas!


Looking for Recipes for Leftover Turkey?

(hover for a description, click a photo for a recipe)
Turkey Tetrazzini on Toast Chicken & Wild Rice Soup (Turkey & Wild Rice Soup) Turkey Wild Rice Casserole





© Copyright 2003 Kitchen Parade



Friday, November 28, 2003

At Last! Black Bean Soup Recipe

Have you ever looked and looked (and looked?!) for the perfect way to make a certain something? At Last! Black Bean Soup became my "only" black bean soup recipe, gracious! more than 20 years ago now. The recipe originated with the late writer Laurie Colwin and has become one of my "signature" recipes.

At Last Black Bean Soup ♥ KitchenParade.com, Laurie Colwin's recipe. Just dump in the ingredients and cook it on the stove, in the oven or in a slow cooker.


COMPLIMENTS!
"This is now my favourite!" ~ mym(e)


In the seven years I masqueraded as a Texan, I looked and looked (and looked) for a great black bean soup to make at home. After several uninspiring batches, at last! I came upon this recipe, one worth making and adapting again and again.

The original recipe came from Laurie Colwin, the food and fiction writer who died too young in 1992. She wrote a monthly column for Gourmet magazine where I was a brand-new reader. Sadly, she was already gone by the time I discovered her but since she wrote ahead, her columns continued to appear after her death. I read each one with building sadness, knowing the columns would also come to an end. And I felt cheated: her work deserved to continue a long time.

As it turns out, the work of Laurie Colwin lives on. Her books remain in print and contain simple home cooking at its finest. Check your library for copies of Home Cooking: A Writer in the Kitchen and More Home Cooking: A Writer Returns to the Kitchen. Reading, you too may feel as if you’ve lost a friend.

FOOD BLOGGERS LOVE LAURIE COLWIN Turns out, I'm not the only one who still misses Laurie Colwin – to say nothing of Gourmet magazine, which also too-soon passed. I wrote a piece for BlogHer (hmmm, also gone ...) called Before There Was Dorie, There Was Laurie: Laurie Colwin, That Is. You'll find links to other Laurie Colwin recipes there too.

EVOLUTION OF A RECIPE Over time, I've adapted Laurie Colwin's recipe for black bean soup to suit my own style and kitchen in the twenty-some years I've been making it. Laurie specified two cups of dried black beans; that's fourteen ounces of beans, a bag is 16 ounces, so I chuck in the whole bag. She used a smidgen of corn; for both color and texture variation, I like quite a lot. She called for vegetable stock; I use the always-on-hand chicken stock and a totally-worth-making-special ham stock.

The next change I'll experiment with is to hold out half the corn and half the sweet potatoes, adding them in the last hour or so for more distinctive color and texture.

ALANNA's TIPS Fourteen cups is a lot – a LOT – of soup so you'll want to choose your very largest pot and even then, make sure it'll hold all the soup. It completely fills our four-quart LeCreuset Dutch oven, fine for cooking in the oven but too small for cooking on the stovetop since there's little room for boiling over if the simmer gets away from me. For the stove, I have to pull out my biggest stockpot. The first time you make this, stay nearby until you identify the proper temperature setting for your stove or slow cooker to maintain a slow simmer. It's one of the reasons why I've come to prefer the oven where I can just set the temperature and let the oven do its work, no adjustment required. Plain diced tomatoes are fine but if you find them, the ones with added green chilies make an especially fine bowl of black bean soup. A finely minced jalapeño pepper adds a welcome extra kick. Just be sure to wash your hands thoroughly after dicing for pepper oil can cause great pain if accidentally rubbed on your eyes or lips. Yes, that's experience talking. :-( To avoid the gas that beans can cause, try a few drops of that stuff called Beano, easily available in grocery stores and also, naturally, on Amazon. Whatever you do, don't skip the lime! The soup will taste like "nothing" – completely bland – without it. Without lime, you'll be thinking I'm a crazy woman, loving this soup so much! Restaurants, especially, garnish black bean soup with chopped green onions, shredded cheddar cheese and a dollop of sour cream. Go ahead, load up if you like, it's good that way, if unnecessary, since the soup itself is so-so-SO good. Great news! At Last! Black Bean Soup freezes beautifully!

AT LAST! BLACK BEAN SOUP RECIPE

Hands-on time: 20 minutes
Total preparation time: 7 – 9 hours
Makes 14 cups
    QUICK COLD SOAK
  • 16 ounces dried black beans
  • 3 cups cold water
    NOW JUST DUMP!
  • 1 - 2 ham shanks or ham hocks, optional but recommended
  • 4 cups chicken stock or vegetable stock (ham stock is especially good)
  • 28 ounces (800g) canned diced tomatoes
  • 1 16-ounce (454g) bag frozen corn
  • 1 large onion, chopped
  • 4 small unpeeled red or 2 medium Yukon gold potatoes, diced or 1 large sweet potato, peeled and diced
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 jalapeño pepper, minced, optional but recommended
  • 2 teaspoons kosher salt
  • Salt and pepper to taste
    TO FINISH
  • Juice from 1 lime (don't skip the lime!)
  • Salt and pepper to taste

QUICK COLD SOAK Place beans in colander. Sift through with your fingers, discarding shriveled beans and foreign objects. Wash thoroughly and sift through again. Place beans and cold water in a four-quart (or larger) dutch oven and soak for one hour. (Yes, an hour! No need to soak overnight! It works, I promise!)

NOW JUST DUMP! Put the pot onto the stove on medium high. As the pot heats up, add all the remaining ingredients (except the lime juice and seasoning) and stir. Bring it to a boil.

TO CONTINUE ON THE STOVE Cover and reduce heat to maintain a slow simmer. Cook for 5 – 7 hours or until beans are soft and fully cooked. While cooking, stir occasionally, adjusting heat and adding additional stock as needed. Taste as you go along, adding salt and pepper as needed.

~or~ CONTINUE IN THE OVEN Cover and let slow cook in the oven for 4 hours at 300F or for 8 hours at 200F. (A combination also works, 2 hours at 300F and 6 hours at 200F, very convenient for making in the evening and cooking overnight!) Check occasionally to see if extra liquid is needed and for seasoning but in my experience, in the oven, it's not.

~or~ CONTINUE IN A SLOW COOKER I know I've made this in the slow cooker before but have no particular notes about how it goes. That said, this recipe seems well-suited to a slow cooker, I would recommend 4 hours on High or 8 hours on Low. Because slow cooker performance varies so much, please stay close and watch how it goes.

TO FINISH Remove the ham shanks and let the meat cool. Pull the meat off the bone and shred into the soup, discarding the fat. Before discarding the bones, if you used ham shanks, do enjoy the bone marrow with a tiny spoon: cook's treat! Laurie Colwin then recommends puréeing about 2 cups of soup in a blender or a food processor (I use an immersion blender right in the pot, it works fine) to add back into the soup. That said, I don't find this necessary; especially in the oven, the beans become quite creamy. Now, most important, squeeze in the lime juice, it makes ALL the difference!

MAKE-AHEAD BLACK BEAN SOUP I make this soup ahead of time all the time, it reheats beautifully though some times does need additional liquid.

NUTRITION INFOMATION Per Cup, without/with ham shank: 166/220 Calories; 1/3g Tot Fat; 0/1g Sat Fat; 33/36g Carb; 10g Fiber; 521/648mg Sodium; 0/19mg Cholesterol; 3/4g Sugar; 9/15g Protein WEIGHT WATCHERS POINTS WW Old Points 3/4 & WW Points Plus 4/6 & WW SmartPoints 5/6. CALORIE COUNTERS 100-calorie serving = half cup/two-thirds cup (6/7g protein).

NOW JUST DUMP!


At Last Black Bean Soup ♥ KitchenParade.com, Laurie Colwin's recipe. Just dump in the ingredients and cook it on the stove, in the oven or in a slow cooker.

Once the black beans soak for an hour – yes, just for an hour, it works, I promise! – just dump in the remaining ingredients and let it cook. This makes At Last! Black Bean Soup so extra-easy to make.


Kitchen Parade is written by second-generation food columnist Alanna Kellogg and features fresh, seasonal dishes for every-day healthful eating and occasional indulgences. Do you have a favorite recipe that you searched for for a long while? Just send me a quick e-mail via recipes@kitchen-parade.com. How to print a Kitchen Parade recipe. Never miss a recipe! If you like this recipe, sign up for a free e-mail subscription. If you like Kitchen Parade, you're sure to like my food blog about vegetable recipes, too, A Veggie Venture. Follow Kitchen Parade on Facebook!

More Supper-Hearty Soup Recipes

(hover for a description, click a photo for a recipe)
Creamy Wild Rice Soup Turkey Sweet Potato Soup Karelian Borscht (Finnish - Russian Beet Borscht Soup)
~ more soup recipes ~

Shop Your Pantry First

(helping home cooks save money on groceries)