Wednesday, August 31, 2005

Peach Un-Cobbler

The Recipe: A cobbler so good, the fruit can shine alone, what I call an "Un-Cobbler" – just leave off the buttery-sugary topping to save 100 and even 200 calories a serving, it's completely virtuous and still-delicious. Or keep the topping, honest, because yeah, of course, to some people, peach cobbler isn't actually peach cobbler without something sweet and crunchy on top.

The Conversation: Getting friendly with the peach man at the farmers market.

Peach Un-Cobbler, because some times, just the fruit is enough. Recipe (including optional topping), tips, nutrition @ KitchenParade.com.

The peach man at the farmers market and I have become friendly this summer. Twice a week, I stop in for a basket of his stand’s fat peaches, juicy orbs that fall off their pits when cut and drip onto your chin when bitten.

What’re you making today? he asks, knowing the likely answer, More cobbler. Every cook’s recipe collection should include at least one good cobbler. All the recipes start with a fruit base, some times peaches, often apples, pears or even apricots, occasionally mixed with berries.

Then the recipes diverge.

Most call for mounds of sweet biscuit baked on top, others for a coat of butter-laden, sugar-sweetened oatmeal or nuts or both. They are both so good but pack on calories.

The cobbler I’ve been longing for is one where the fruit can shine, one you might eat every day if you were careful, one with a small measure of crunch and richness.

And I found it.

Better still, I discovered Peach Uncobbler, all fruit, no topping, and deliciously virtuous. (Or would that be virtuously delicious?)

Try one, try both. Either way, your answer will become, More cobbler, please.

ALANNA's TIPS To easily cut the fruit, place the peach halves flatside down on a cutting board, then slice lengthwise four or five times. Holding the slices together with your fingers, cut crosswise two or three times. Let your taste buds guide your preparations. In the fruit, tawny port and brandy are good substitutes, as are cardamom and mace.
Kitchen Parade is written by second-generation food columnist Alanna Kellogg and features fresh, seasonal dishes for every-day healthful eating and occasional indulgences. Quick Suppers are Kitchen Parade favorites and feature recipes easy on the budget, the clock, the waistline and the dishwasher. Do you have a favorite recipe that other Kitchen Parade readers might like? Just send me a quick e-mail via recipes@kitchen-parade.com. How to print a Kitchen Parade recipe. Never miss a recipe! If you like this recipe, sign up for a free e-mail subscription. If you like Kitchen Parade, you're sure to like my food blog about vegetable recipes, too, A Veggie Venture. Follow Kitchen Parade on Facebook!

PEACH UN-COBBLER

Some times, the fruit is more than enough
Hands-on time: 10 minutes fruit only, 20 minutes with topping
Time-to-table: 80 minutes
Serves 4
    PEACHES
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • Zest from half a lemon
  • 1 tablespoon fruity liqueur (such as Gran Marnier) or lemon juice
  • 1 teaspoon cornstarch
  • 1 teaspoon fruity spice such as ginger, cinnamon or nutmeg
  • 3 large ripe peaches (about 1-1/2 pounds)

  • COBBLER TOPPING, OPTIONAL
  • 1/2 cup flour (whole wheat is good)
  • 2 tablespoons brown sugar
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon table salt
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1/3 cup toasted pecans, optional

Heat oven to 425F/220C.

PEACHES Mix sugar, lemon zest, liqueur, cornstarch and spice in a large bowl. Halve peaches, remove pits and cut into bite-size pieces. (See ALANNA’s TIPS.) Stir fruit into sugar mixture. Transfer to four one-cup ramekins.

WITHOUT COBBLER TOPPING

Bake until peaches are cooked and bubbly, about 35 minutes.

WITH COBBLER TOPPING

Bake peaches alone for 10 minutes.

Mix the cobbler topping’s dry ingredients in a small bowl, then mix in butter with your fingers, then add the nuts.

Arrange evenly atop the partially baked peaches and bake another 25 minutes until peaches are cooked and bubbly and the topping is crispy and golden.

TO SERVE Let cool 30 minutes before serving.

NUTRITION INFORMATION
Fruit Only, per serving: 97 Calories; 0g Tot Fat; 0g Sat Fat; 0mg Cholesterol; 0mg Sodium; 23g Carb; 2g Fiber; 20g Sugar; 1g Protein. WEIGHT WATCHERS POINTS WW Old Points 1.5 & WW Points Plus 3.

With Cobbler Topping Without/With Pecans, per serving: 229/299 Calories; 6/13g Tot Fat; 4g Sat Fat; 15mg Cholesterol; 269mg Sodium; 41/42g Carb; 3/4g Fiber; 27g Sugar; 3/4g Protein. WEIGHT WATCHERS POINTS WW Old Points 4.5/6 & WW Points Plus 6/8.

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Sunday, August 14, 2005

Summer's Tomato Soup

A simple, light herb-tinged homemade tomato soup, made with fresh tomatoes. Beautiful color. Looks simple, tastes complex.

Summer's Tomato Soup, a simple, homemade tomato soup made with fresh tomatoes. Beautiful color, looks simple, tastes complex.


COMPLIMENTS!
"... we couldn't believe how something so simple was so delicious." ~ Anonymous
“This is fantastic!" ~ Jessica


Summer tomatoes and college kids are a lot alike. Oh! The anticipation of their arrival! And while they’re around, it’s hard to get enough. And when they’re gone, far too soon, you miss ‘em.

Here in eastern Missouri, once Arkansas’ picked-three-days-before-yesterday tomato invaders show up, the picked-this-mornin’ local tomatoes aren’t far behind.

For a couple of weeks, it’s red heaven on a plate. Sliced and salted. Sliced and sugared. Sliced and slivered with basil and slippery with mozzarella.

And then into September, it's tomatoes grilled, broiled, roasted, sandwiched and then finally, souped.

SUMMER’s TOMATO SOUP is a light, herb-tinged soup that makes for a perfect starter or a light supper. It's as different from Winter Tomato Soup as, well, summer and winter, sun and snow, long hot days and short cold days.

ALANNA's TIPS For a slightly less home-spun company-for-supper version, use whole milk for richness and purée the soup in a blender for smoothness. For something in-between, make the soup with skim milk, then stir in a splash of half 'n' half. Some times, I add a dollop of basil pesto to each bowl. Wash, dry and then freeze tomatoes (as is, no canning, no chopping) at their summer peak for soups and stews in winter. Just before using, if you like, hold a still-frozen tomato under warm tap water to easily remove the skin.

First published in print and online in 2005, such a favorite recipe, republished online in 2014.

SUMMER’s TOMATO SOUP

Hands-on time: 10 minutes
Time-to-table: 15 minutes
Makes 5 cups
  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • 1/2 cup finely diced onion
  • 1 tablespoon flour
  • 1 pound perfectly ripe tomatoes
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon baking soda
  • 2 cups skim milk (see ALANNA’s TIPS)
  • Bits of fresh basil or thyme

Heat a large pot on medium high and melt the butter. Add the onion, stir well to coat with fat and let cook for 2 – 3 minutes until soft but before turning golden. Add the flour, let cook for about 1 minute, stirring continuously. Stir in the tomatoes, water and sugar, let cook until heated through, about 5 minutes. (If you like, prepare to this point and refrigerate or freeze. Reheat before proceeding.)

Stir in the salt and soda. Don’t worry when the mixture foams up, it's supposed to! Add the milk and heat through but do not allow to boil. Serve immediately topped with bits of basil or thyme.

NUTRITION INFORMATION Per Cup with skim/whole milk: 86/110 Calories; 2/5g Tot Fat; 2/3g Sat Fat; 7/15mg Cholesterol; 600/588mg Sodium; 12g Carb; 1g Fiber; 9g Sugar; 5/4g Protein. WEIGHT WATCHERS POINTS WW Old Points 1.5/2 & WW Points Plus 2/3.
Adapted from a recipe from my dear Auntie Gloria, her story is here in the family recipe for Brown Sugar Lemon Curd.

Kitchen Parade is written by second-generation food columnist Alanna Kellogg and features fresh, seasonal dishes for every-day healthful eating and occasional indulgences. Quick Suppers are Kitchen Parade favorites and feature recipes easy on the budget, the clock, the waistline and the dishwasher. Do you have a favorite recipe that other Kitchen Parade readers might like? Just send me a quick e-mail via recipes@kitchen-parade.com. How to print a Kitchen Parade recipe. Never miss a recipe! If you like this recipe, sign up for a free e-mail subscription. If you like Kitchen Parade, you're sure to like my food blog about vegetable recipes, too, A Veggie Venture. Follow Kitchen Parade on Facebook!

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