Friday, June 30, 2006

Buttered Pecan Ice Cream

Recipe for homemade buttered pecan ice cream, old-fashioned and delicious. Plus, to pair with the ice cream, a simple recipe for Meringue Cookies, sweet and studded with pecans. Plus, an introduction to native Missouri pecans, smaller and sweeter than pecans from other regions.

Buttered Pecan Ice Cream made from Missouri native pecans

It’s time for the Show-Me State to show off its culinary gold: fingertip-tiny, syrup-sweet, native Missouri pecans.

Missouri is the northernmost reach of pecan country. Our shorter season and colder climate produce nuts that are smaller, sweeter and richer than the southern brethren.

The trees grow alongside fields and rivers, mostly in farm country near Brunswick, 50 crow-miles northwest of Columbia, and Nevada, 90 miles south of Kansas City.

Many trees are 200 years old. These days, farm entrepreneurs plant groves. “For the grandchildren,” they laugh, since trees don’t produce nuts for 15 or 20 years. Tree by tree, the nuts are painstakingly harvested in November.

Missouri pecans are Show-Me special for lucky-we-live-close cooks. Seek them out in local markets, then buy enough to last through the next harvest, allowing for new demand. Store in the freezer to keep fresh.

PECAN MERINGUE COOKIES Beat an egg white til stiff, then slowly beat in 1 cup brown sugar, 1/4 teaspoon table salt and 1/2 teaspoon vanilla. Fold in 1 cup chopped pecans. Using one spoon to scoop, another to scrape, arrange on a parchment-covered baking sheet. Bake for about 12 minutes at 325F. Makes two dozen.
ALANNA's TIPS This ice cream is barely sweet to pair with the meringue cookies. If you prefer sweeter ice cream or aren’t making the cookies, increase the maple syrup to 1 cup. This is the perfect occasion for a finishing salt such as fleur de sel.

BUTTERED PECAN ICE CREAM

Old-fashioned goodness
Active time: 50 minutes (20 hands-on)
Time to table: 24 hours
Makes 4 cups
    CUSTARD for ICE CREAM
  • 2 cups whole milk
  • 2 cups cream
  • 4 eggs
  • 1/2 cup maple syrup (see TIPS)
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
    BUTTERED PECANS
  • 1 tablespoon unsalted butter
  • 1 cup pecans, finely chopped
  • 1/4 teaspoon good salt (see TIPS)

Preheat oven to 350F.

CUSTARD In a large saucepan, heat milk and cream on medium, stirring often, til very hot but do not boil. Separately, whisk eggs, maple syrup and vanilla. Whisking continuously, pour hot liquid into eggs a half cup at a time. Return to saucepan. Cook until thick, stirring continuously. (It’s done once a spoon dipped in the custard keeps a clean line when a finger is drawn across; or when an instant-read thermometer reads 170F – 175F.) Strain through a sieve into a glass container, discarding solids. Place plastic wrap on surface of custard, cover and refrigerate 24 hours.

PECANS While custard cooks, melt butter in microwave in 10-second increments. Stir in pecans and salt. Transfer to rimmed baking sheet. Toast nuts for 8 minutes, til nuts absorb butter and turn shade darker. Cool then refrigerate.

ICE CREAM Process custard in ice cream maker til thick. Add pecans in last 5 minutes. Serve immediately or return to freezer to serve later.

NUTRITION ESTIMATE Per 1/2 Cup: 345 Cal; 27g Tot Fat; 11g Sat Fat; 20g Carb; 1g Fiber; 160mg Sodium; 176mg Cholesterol; Weight Watchers 8 points

LATER NOTES

MAPLE ICE CREAM This recipe makes a delicious maple ice cream, one of my favorites, especially served with Walnut Chocolate Cake. Just omit the pecans. For a smaller batch than specified here, in 2009 I cooked down 3/4 cup of maple syrup to 1/2 cup, then used 2 cups cream, 1 cup whole milk and just two egg yolks to make the custard. It was deliciously rich but had considerably fewer calories.
Where to purchase Missouri native pecans? The season for fresh pecans is late fall, just before Thanksgiving. Here are St Louis and Missouri locations.

Kitchen Parade is written by second-generation food columnist Alanna Kellogg and features fresh, seasonal dishes for every-day healthful eating and occasional indulgences.
Do you have a favorite ice cream recipe that other Kitchen Parade readers might like? Just send me a quick e-mail via recipes@kitchen-parade.com.
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How to print a recipe on Kitchen Parade.
If you like Kitchen Parade, forward this recipe to a friend who might too!

More Ice Cream Recipes

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Homemade Frozen Yogurt with Blackberry Sauce Molasses Ice Cream Strawberry Ice Cream



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Friday, June 23, 2006

Maple Glazed Salmon

Maple Glazed Salmon, with a bite of pepper

Every week, another story emerges about the miracles worked by salmon. If the claims are to be believed, it’s the cancer-curing, figure-fending, wrinkle-ravaging, memory-mothering, clock-stopping, energy-saving, chocolate-tasting (okay, not that last one) food of the decade.

Whether the claims prove true hardly matters since salmon is so readily available, tastes so great and gets to the table so fast.

My recipe box includes a dozen great ways to cook salmon but this maple syrup-glazed treatment trumps them all. It’s a reincarnation of the French-classic and 1980s-trendy peppered steak, this time with buttery fish and cooked in just minutes under high heat.

Truth be told, it is a miracle food.

ALANNA's TIPS Salmon steaks, individual filets and thick filets from warehouse clubs all work well. If the skin’s still on one side, the salmon will be slightly tastier. Believe it or not, pancake syrup, even sugar-free pancake syrup, is a decent substitute for pricey maple syrup. My aunt uses sugar-free syrup to make this salmon and recommends the sugar-free syrup from Joseph's in New Mexico. The maple syrup-soy mixture can marinate two pounds of salmon so consider cooking extra for planned-overs. Commercial coarse pepper works better than freshly ground pepper. Do use a lot of pepper, more than seems imaginable! as much as a quarter cup. If it’s too peppery for someone, it’s easy to scrape off later. The salmon can be grilled as well.
Kitchen Parade is written by second-generation food columnist Alanna Kellogg and features fresh, seasonal dishes for every-day healthful eating and occasional indulgences. Do you have a favorite salmon recipe that other Kitchen Parade readers might like? Just send me a quick e-mail via recipes@kitchen-parade.com. How to print a Kitchen Parade recipe. Never miss a recipe! If you like this recipe, sign up for a free e-mail subscription. If you like Kitchen Parade, you're sure to like my food blog about vegetable recipes, too, A Veggie Venture. Follow Kitchen Parade on Facebook!

QUICK SUPPER:
MAPLE GLAZED SALMON

Sweet & peppery marinated salmon
Up-front prep: 5 minutes
Then marinate 4 – 48 hours
Then prep: 5 minutes
Then time to table: 25 minutes
Serves 4
  • 1 pound salmon (see ALANNA’s TIPS)
  • 3/4 cup (220g) maple syrup (see TIPS)
  • 1/4 cup (65g) soy sauce
  • Cooking spray
  • Plenty of coarse black pepper (see TIPS)

Combine the salmon, maple syrup and soy sauce in a ziplock bag. (If you like, place the bag in a bowl to hold it up straight.) Marinate in the refrigerator for at least 4 hours (no skimping!) and as long as 48 hours, turning occasionally.

Move an oven rack to the top position and preheat to 500F.

Cover a rimmed baking sheet with foil and spritz with cooking spray. Remove the salmon (discard the remaining marinade) and arrange (skin-side down for filets with skin) on the baking sheet. Thickly and firmly, press the pepper into the top side.

Cook the salmon for about 6 minutes for individual filets or 10 minutes for fat filets or steaks. (The rule of thumb is 10 minutes per inch of thickness.) The salmon is done when the flesh has turned pale pink but remains moist.

SERVING SUGGESTIONS This salmon pairs beautifully with Roasted Zucchini with Lemon. Both require a 500F oven, a rarity. I also like to serve the marinated and peppered salmon over fresh asparagus, combining this recipe and the one for Roasted Salmon & Asparagus.

NUTRITION ESTIMATE Per Serving (with maple syrup): 275 Calories; 13g Tot Fat; 3g Sat Fat; 17g Carb; 1g Fiber; 374mg Sodium; 67mg Cholesterol. WEIGHT WATCHERS Old Points 6, PointsPlus 8
Adapted from a recipe from my cousin Lynda.

More Salmon Recipes

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Salmon Chowder Roasted Salmon & Asparagus Smoked Salmon Salad
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Friday, June 16, 2006

Holy Slaw!

A flavorful slaw, hallelujah!

Nothing like a church potluck.

Make a trip or two or three along those long tables of home-cooked food, one tempting casserole after another delicious dessert (and don’t forget Mrs. Barry’s pecan pie), it’s no wonder that afterward folks head toward home heavy-eyed and hoping for a Sunday afternoon nap.

Salads seem to be scarce at potlucks so colorful HOLY SLAW! will be a welcome addition come the next one. The dressing is unusual, a tasty blend of Asian-inspired flavors. I’m willing to bet a nap that you’ll gather both compliments and recipe requests.

ALANNA's TIPS Watch your supermarket or international grocery for jars of minced ginger that are such huge timesavers you may find yourself going out of your way to use fresh ginger. This coleslaw loses punch and crunch after an hour, so mix only what can be eaten on the spot. You can still make it ahead of time, just save the last step until right before eating. If it’ll be eaten over several days, mix the dressing and chop the peppers, carrots and green onions in advance. At the last minute, quickly chop some cilantro, add it to a portion of the pepper-carrot mix, then stir in some cabbage and some dressing.
Kitchen Parade is written by second-generation food writer Alanna Kellogg and features fresh, seasonal dishes for every-day healthful eating and occasional indulgences. Send the recipe for a favorite potluck item to e-mail.

HOLY SLAW!

Crunchy vegetables in a peanut dressing
Hands-on time: 20 minutes
Time-to-table: 20 minutes
Makes 7 cups
    DRESSING
  • 3 tablespoons rice vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 2 tablespoons oil, preferably peanut
  • ½ tablespoon sesame oil (a key ingredient, try not to skip)
  • 2 tablespoons peanut butter (preferably low-fat)
  • ½ tablespoon minced garlic
  • ½ tablespoon fresh minced ginger
  • ¼ teaspoon Thai chili sauce (or Tabasco, for a bit of heat)

  • SLAW
  • 1 red sweet pepper, diced
  • 1 yellow sweet pepper, diced
  • 2 carrots, peeled and diced
  • 4 green onions, white and green parts, chopped
  • 1 cup chopped cilantro
  • 16 ounces chopped cabbage

Whisk dressing ingredients in a small bowl. Combine the peppers, carrots and green onions in a large serving bowl. About 15 minutes before serving, stir in the cilantro, cabbage and dressing and combine well.

NUTRITION ESTIMATE Per ½ Cup: 55 Cal (51% from Fat); 3g Tot Fat; 1g Sat Fat; 6g Carb; 2g Fiber; 154mg Sodium; 0mg Cholesterol, Weight Watchers 1 point

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Friday, June 9, 2006

Tropical Supper Salad

This salad is a magical combination of flavors and textures, "every bite is different" someone said recently when I made a triple batch for an impromptu family supper. It's a "concept" recipe for a mixed vegetable and fruit salad, just be sure to include plenty of fruit, that's what makes this salad special. While the salad stands alone, it's especially designed to pair with Tropical Pork Tenderloin, just pork tenderloin seasoned with a distinctive rub and roasted. For a large gathering, I like to cook the pork ahead of time and chill, then slice it thin with an electric knife.

Tropical Salad Supper, a magical melange of fruits and vegetables in a lime vinaigrette, goes beautifully with the companion recipe for Tropical Pork Tenderlion.

Is it the same in towns and cities everywhere now’days? In my neighborhood, especially on the weekends, fathers push strollers as much as mothers.

Weekdays, the Mom Parade starts about nine, mostly power-stroller-walking two and three abreast, faces taut and determined, filled with triple-tasking purpose: If we walk and talk fast enough for an hour, the baby will get out, our bellies will firm up, we’ll forget we’re sleep-deprived.

Weekends, the dads some times line up in pairs and an occasional trio too. But their guffaws, their strides exude relaxed satisfaction, reminding passersby why strollers, indeed, are for strolling.

How is it that a man is most masculine, most like a real guy’s guy and a real man’s man, when he’s parenting?

I’m not sure except to be certain: Lucky kids. Lucky moms. And most especially, lucky lucky dads.

ALANNA's TIPS Observant cooks will notice less oil in Kitchen Parade salad dressings. It’s more healthful, of course, but also helps other flavors shine. Am I the last to discover Napa cabbage? It’s unlike waxy green and purple cabbages, more like lettuce with crunch. Its crinkly leaves chop up for salads or slaws or stir fries in no time. To prevent peeled bananas and avocados from browning as they will after a few minutes in open air, wet with a splash of citrus juice or drop briefly (no more than a couple of minutes) into what’s called ‘acidulated water’, that's kitchen code for adding a tablespoon of lemon juice per cup of water.
Kitchen Parade is written by second-generation food columnist Alanna Kellogg and features fresh, seasonal dishes for every-day healthful eating and occasional indulgences. Quick Suppers are Kitchen Parade favorites and feature recipes easy on the budget, the clock, the waistline and the dishwasher. Do you have a favorite recipe that other Kitchen Parade readers might like? Just send me a quick e-mail via recipes@kitchen-parade.com. How to print a Kitchen Parade recipe. Never miss a recipe! If you like this recipe, sign up for a free e-mail subscription. If you like Kitchen Parade, you're sure to like my food blog about vegetable recipes, too, A Veggie Venture. Follow Kitchen Parade on Facebook!

QUICK SUPPER:
TROPICAL SUPPER SALAD

Bright with citrus and tropical fruit
Time to table: 20 minutes
Serves 4
    LIME VINAIGRETTE
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • Zest from 1 lime
  • Juice from 3 limes (about 3 tablespoons)
  • 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 1 teaspoon curry powder
  • ½ teaspoon kosher salt
  • ¼ teaspoon black pepper
    SALAD
  • 1 red bell pepper, cut in thick matchsticks
  • 1/2 cup currants
  • 4 cups thin-sliced Napa cabbage
  • 4 cups baby spinach
  • 2 ‘wet fruits’ such as mango, orange or banana, in slices or bite-size pieces
  • 1 avocado, in slices or bite-size pieces, optional but delicious

LIME VINAIGRETTE Whisk vinaigrette ingredients. Makes about a 1/2 cup. May be mixed in advance, just refrigerate but return to room temperature before dressing the salad.)

SALAD In a large bowl, combine pepper and currants. (Stop here if prepping more than 30 minutes in advance.) Stir in cabbage, spinach, fruit and avocado. Toss with Lime Vinaigrette (you might not use it all).

TO SERVE Arrange salad on serving plates. If you're serving meat too, arrange it on top of or beside the salad. Serve and enjoy!

NUTRITION INFORMATION
LIME VINAIGRETTE ONLY, Per Tablespoon: 39 Calories; 3g Tot Fat; 0g Sat Fat; 0mg Cholesterol; 94mg Sodium; 2g Carb; 0g Fiber; 2g Sugar; 0g Protein. WEIGHT WATCHERS POINTS WW Old Points 1 & WW Points Plus 1.

LIME VINAIGRETTE & SALAD COMBINED, Per Serving (assumes 2T dressing, without/with avocado): 225/305 Calories; 7/14g Tot Fat; 1/2g Sat Fat; 0mg Cholesterol; 228/232mg Sodium; 4145g Carb; 5/8g Fiber; 29g Sugar; 4/5g Protein. WEIGHT WATCHERS POINTS WW Old Points 4/6.5 & WW Points Plus 6/8. CALORIE COUNTERS for a 100-calorie serving, omit the avocado, dress 1/9th of the salad with 1T Lime Vinaigrette.

More "Salad Supper" Recipes

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Red Quinoa Salad Your Way Chicken Greek Salad Shrimp Salad Recipes

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