Friday, November 24, 2006

Turkey Wild Rice Casserole

My long-time go-to wild rice casserole, perfect with after-Thanksgiving leftover turkey.

Turkey Wild Rice Casserole

So let’s talk turkey.

We perch in separate broods, the crowd which loves Thanksgiving dinner and the gang which holds out for Thanksgiving leftovers.

Last year, I might have been the happiest person not cooking a turkey. That’s because I stuffed myself at dinner and then came home with the carcass of a fifteen-pound bird that the next day yielded ten cups of stock and nearly as much meat.

So keep your brined and roasted and smoked and deep-fried turkeys fresh-sliced for the holiday table.

Just send me home with nothing but bones to feast for weeks, starting with sandwiches and warmed-overs before moving onto hot soup and pot pie and exotic-sounding, if you think about it, plain-fare turkey tetrazzini (like my mom's recipe for Turkey Tetrazzini) and turkey enchiladas.

But most years, the choice is a comfort-food casserole, a one-dish supper that’ll hold over the leftover-lovin’ turkeys til next year.

ALANNA's TIPS To feed more mouths, add fresh mushrooms, frozen corn or peas or stir in mashed potatoes. For a festive variation, add dried cranberries. For good crunch, chop up a can of water chestnuts, stir them in with the turkey. To stock your freezer without an inventory of dishes, try this technique. Line a casserole dish with plastic wrap, spray lightly with cooking spray. Add the casserole contents and freeze overnight. Lift the frozen casserole out of the dish, wrap it with foil and return to the freezer without the dish. Two days before serving, peel off the foil and plastic wrap, tuck the perfectly shaped casserole back into the dish for thawing and cooking. It’s a snap!
Kitchen Parade is written by second-generation food columnist Alanna Kellogg and features fresh, seasonal dishes for every-day healthful eating and occasional indulgences. What happens to your Thanksgiving leftovers? Send ideas via recipes@kitchen-parade.com. How to print a Kitchen Parade recipe. Never miss a recipe! If you like this recipe, sign up for a free e-mail subscription. If you like Kitchen Parade, you're sure to like my food blog about vegetable recipes, too, A Veggie Venture. Follow Kitchen Parade on Facebook!

TURKEY WILD RICE CASSEROLE

Prep time: 50 minutes (40 hands-on)
Time-to-table: 90 minutes
Serves 8
  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • 1 large onion, diced (about 1-1/2 cups)
  • 4 ribs celery, diced (about 2 cups)
  • 1 large carrot, grated (about 1 cup)
  • 2 cups turkey stock or 15 ounces canned chicken broth
  • 2 cups half & half (see Later Notes) whisked until smooth with 1/4 cup flour
  • 2 tablespoons dry sherry
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon pepper
  • 3 cups cooked turkey (about 3/4 pound), diced

Bring water to boil in a saucepan. Stir in salt and rice, simmer for 30 - 45 minutes until the rice is tender but still chewy.

Meanwhile, in a large skillet, melt the butter and sauté the onion, celery and carrots until soft. Add the stock and bring to a boil, then slowly stir in the cream/flour mixture. Add the sherry, salt and pepper. Add the turkey and let simmer slowly while the rice finishes.

Gently stir rice into the turkey mixture. Transfer to two-quart greased casserole dish. (See ALANNA’s TIPS.) Top with almonds and bake for 35 – 40 minutes at 375F.

Serve with cranberry sauce on the side.

LATER NOTES This recipe goes way-way back, I have made it many times. But when I made it in 2010, the mixture seemed right with just one cup of half & half (mixed with 1/4 cup flour) and baked up perfectly. So you might start with just a cup of liquid, then decide whether the second cup is needed. It never hurts to save a few calories, too. :-)

NUTRITION ESTIMATE Per Serving: 326 Calories; 13g Tot Fat; 30g Carb; 3g Fiber; 664mg Sodium; 78mg Cholesterol; Weight Watchers 7 points This recipe has been ‘Alanna-sized’ with increases in no-calorie flavorings and fiber-rich vegetables.

More Wild Rice Recipes

(hover for a description, click a photo for a recipe)
Oven-Baked Brown Rice Creamy Wild Rice Soup Chicken & Wild Rice Soup (Turkey & Wild Rice Soup)

More Recipe Ideas for Leftover Turkey

(hover for a description, click a photo for a recipe)
Turkey Tetrazzini on Toast Turkey Sweet Potato Soup Lemon Turkey Noodle Soup

What's Your Favorite Way to Use Up Leftover Turkey?

I'd love to know your family's favorites! Let me know in the comments!


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© Copyright 2006 Kitchen Parade



Friday, November 17, 2006

Turnip Puff or Rutabaga Puff:
Thanksgiving Vegetable Recipes

A tasty purée of root vegetables, either purple-topped turnips or, as pictured here, the lovely sunny-fleshed rutabagas. A favorite Thanksgiving vegetable recipe from my Canadian family.

Turnip Puff or Rutabaga Puff ♥ KitchenParade.com, a delicious purée of root vegetables, either turnip or the sunny-colored rutabaga, also called a 'swede'. A Thanksgiving favorite!
One small boy to another: “Of course I know the facts of life: Wash your hands. Eat your vegetables.”

In some families, it’s a fact of life that it’s risky to buck tradition at Thanksgiving. Every year, it’s Grandma’s same cornbread stuffing and Cousin Isabelle’s favorite sweet potatoes.

Here, the requisite vegetable has been my Auntie Gloria’s Squash Puff. Then I learned that she and my Canadian family have supplanted squash with turnip.

Both are fall vegetables. Both versions are mashed. But somehow a squash puff and a turnip puff are entirely different. And since there’s no choosing between the two, now both are essential!

Turnip pairs well with roast beef and turkey both. So if your Thanksgiving menu is already cast in the irons of family custom, consider adding a Turnip Puff to the less rule-ruled Christmas meal.

Wanna know something funny? After publishing this recipe, I learned that Canadian supermarkets label what I call "rutabagas" turnips. So my Canadian family actually makes this Thanksgiving casserole with rutabagas, not purple-topped turnips. Ha!

The good news is that I make this dish with both and both are excellent. If I were to prefer one, it's the Rutabaga Puff, if only for its sunny yellow color and slightly sweeter flavor. But truly, you'll not go wrong with either.

ALANNA's TIPS Both a Turnip Puff and a Rutabaga Puff reheat beautifully with other Thanksgiving leftovers. Try irregularly shaped and thus extra-crispy Japanese breadcrumbs called panko (pronounced PAHN-ko) found at specialty food stores and some supermarkets.

TURNIP PUFF or RUTABAGA PUFF

Hands-on time: 25 minutes
Time-to-table: 75 minutes
Makes 4 cups
  • 3 pounds purple-topped turnips (about 6 large) or rutabagas (about 1 large)
  • 2 large eggs
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 3 tablespoons flour
  • 1 tablespoon brown sugar
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon kosher or sea salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon white pepper
  • Pinch nutmeg
  • 1/2 cup panko or dry bread crumbs (see ALANNA’s TIPS)
  • 2 tablespoons melted butter

Peel the turnips or rutabagas and cut into roughly equal-size quarters. Cook in boiling salted water until soft. (Stop here and refrigerate if preparing a day before.)

Mash the turnips or rutabagas in a large bowl with a mixer. Add the eggs, butter, flour, brown sugar, baking powder, salt, pepper and nutmeg and combine well. Transfer to a buttered casserole dish.

Combine the crumbs and butter and sprinkle evenly on top. (Stop here and refrigerate if preparing a few hours before.)

Bake at 375F/190C until lightly browned on top, about 30 minutes if starting from room temperature, about 50 minutes if starting from the refrigerator.

NUTRITION INFORMATION Per Half Cup: 155 Calories; 8g Tot Fat; 4g Sat Fat; 18g Carb; 4g Fiber; 495mg Sodium; 77mg Cholesterol. WEIGHT WATCHERS POINTS Old Points 3 & PointsPlus 4

Kitchen Parade is written by second-generation food columnist Alanna Kellogg and features fresh, seasonal dishes for every-day healthful eating and occasional indulgences. Do you have a favorite recipe that other Kitchen Parade readers might like? Just send me a quick e-mail via recipes@kitchen-parade.com. How to print a Kitchen Parade recipe. If you like Kitchen Parade, you're sure to like my food blog about vegetable recipes, too, A Veggie Venture. Become a Kitchen Parade fan on Facebook!

More Thanksgiving Vegetable Recipes

(hover for a description, click a photo for a recipe)
Roasted Butternut Squash & Apple Mashed Potatoes & Carrots Squash Puff
~ more vegetable recipes ~
~ more Thanksgiving recipes ~
from Kitchen Parade

~ World's Best Green Bean Casserole ~
~ Fresh Candied Yams ~
~ Cauliflower Cream ~
~ more Thanksgiving vegetable recipes ~
from A Veggie Venture, my food blog

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© Copyright Kitchen Parade 2006, 2007, 2010 & 2015



Monday, November 6, 2006

White Chicken Chili

What could be better on a cold night than a bowl of homemade White Chicken Chili, especially one made extra-easy (if you like) with a rotisserie chicken or even leftover Thanksgiving turkey?

And speaking of Thanksgiving, everyone ready? Or should I say, ANYbody ready? : -) This recipe fits perfectly with my annual Thanksgiving Public Service Announcement. I recommend adding just one more thing to your already-long to-cook. But it's not what you might think. Read on!

~Recipe updated & republished 2015 for a little weekend cooking inspiration~

White Chicken Chili ♥ KitchenParade.com, a spicy-but-not-too-spicy concoction of chicken, spices, chilies and white beans, so good on a chilly night!

The clocks are sorry, the clocks are very sad. One stops, one goes on striking the wrong hours.
– Donald Justice, poet,
after losing his mother


In much of the country, we turn back the hands of the clock in late autumn, creating the illusion of a gifted hour.

My first job, I rode the bus to work. Frugality was the reason but I soon treasured the rhythm: workward, reading the morning paper; homeward, reading a book.

But after the fall time change, as the bus lumbered through neighborhoods whose names not residents I knew, I ignored my book and instead peered through thick glass.

On the Mondays and some times the Tuesdays and even the Wednesdays, folks had yet to adjust their evening routines: the drapes, the blinds, the curtains, they all remained open.

So the bright lights of kitchens and front rooms spilled into the dark, illuminating the families cocooned inside the warmth of their homes in living panoramas, mothers at the stove, kids at the table with schoolwork, the flicker of television in another room.

It was indeed a gifted hour, one I repeat, now on foot with the dog, each year.

ALANNA's TIPS For an easy shortcut, cut up the breasts of a rotisserie chicken or use leftover cooked turkey. Just add it in the middle, when the cooked chicken is added. For more volume, use all the meat from a rotisserie chicken, just be sure to add another 1-1/2 cups chicken stock. White kidney beans, called cannellini beans, are firmer than navy beans or great northern beans so are a better choice for a hearty soup like this that cooks for awhile and will likely be reheated as leftovers. When I first started making WHITE CHICKEN CHILI, I used fat-free half & half instead of regular half & half. But over time I became uncomfortable with its ingredient list; the fat-free product also appears curdled although the taste is fine. However, there are calorie consequences to a full two cups of real half & half. So mostly I use something less than that, 1-1/2 cups whole milk and 1/2 cup cream, say, even 2 cups whole milk. Half & half is a North American dairy product, half cream and half whole milk.

KITCHEN CLASSIC:
WHITE CHICKEN CHILI

Hands-on time: 30 minutes up front
Time to table: 1 - 2 hours
Makes 9 cups
  • 1 pound chicken breasts, cut in several large pieces
  • 1-1/2 cups (14 ounces) chicken stock
  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • 1 tablespoon chili powder
  • 2 teaspoons cumin
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • Pepper to taste
  • 1/4 cup water
  • 1 large onion, chopped
  • 1 poblano pepper, chopped
  • 1 red pepper, chopped
  • 1 tablespoon minced garlic
  • 8 ounces canned chopped mild green chilies
  • 2 tablespoons flour
  • 28 ounces canned white beans, rinsed and drained
  • 14 ounces canned corn, including liquid
  • 1 tablespoon vinegar (don't skip)
  • 2 cups half ‘n’ half or fat-free half 'n' half
  • 1/2 cup low-fat (not non-fat) sour cream
  • 1/2 teaspoon Tabasco, optional
  • Chopped cilantro, for garnish

In a large heavy pot, cook chicken in splash of the chicken broth in a Dutch oven over medium heat until cooked. Heat remaining broth in microwave. Transfer chicken to a dish to hold. When it cools, "pull" the chicken into strands.

In the same pot, melt the butter with the chili powder, cumin, salt and pepper. Add the water, onion, red pepper, garlic and chilies; cook until onions and peppers are soft.

Sprinkle the flour over top and stir in, let mixture cook 1 minute.

Stir in hot stock, cooked chicken, beans, corn and vinegar. Cover and bring to a boil, reduce heat to simmer for 45 to 90 minutes.

Stir in half ‘n’ half, sour cream and Tabasco; rewarm but do not allow to boil, otherwise the mixture will curdle.

To serve, ladle into soup bowls and sprinkle with cilantro. Serve and enjoy!

NUTRITION INFORMATION Per Cup (made with fat-free half 'n' half/regular half 'n' half): 230/300 Calories; 4/10g Tot Fat; 2/6g Sat Fat; 37/57mg Cholesterol; 806/828mg Sodium; 29/31g Carb; 7g Fiber; 5g Sugar; 19/21g Protein. WEIGHT WATCHERS POINTS WW Old Points 4/6 & WW Points Plus 5/7.

My Annual Thanksgiving Public Service Announcement:
Make Soup!


White Chicken Chili ♥ KitchenParade.com, a spicy-but-not-too-spicy concoction of chicken, spices, chilies and white beans, so good on a chilly night!

Who else is cooking a big Thanksgiving Dinner this year? I really love the kitchen hyper-productivity that Thanksgiving requires but at the end of the day on Tuesday and especially Wednesday, the fridge is full of food but it's all for the Big Day, there's nothing to eat now! 1-800-Pizza? Sure! Or, better yet, on the Sunday or Monday before, make a big pot of soup that'll sustain throughout the week. This would be a good one, it makes up quickly, is hearty and filling and can easily pair with biscuits, tortillas, etc. So good!


Kitchen Parade is written by second-generation food columnist Alanna Kellogg and features fresh, seasonal dishes for every-day healthful eating and occasional indulgences. Do you have a favorite recipe that other Kitchen Parade readers might like? Just send me a quick e-mail via recipes@kitchen-parade.com. How to print a Kitchen Parade recipe. Never miss a recipe! If you like this recipe, sign up for a free e-mail subscription. If you like Kitchen Parade, you're sure to like my food blog about vegetable recipes, too, A Veggie Venture. Follow Kitchen Parade on Facebook!

More Hearty Chili Recipes

(hover for a description, click a photo for a recipe)
Crockpot Chili with Spicy Sausage Chocolate Chili Twenty-Minute Beefy Black Bean Chili

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© Copyright Kitchen Parade 2006, 2007, 2008, 2013 & 2015 (repub)