Fried Bread

Everybody's doing it. And I'm doing it too. Won't you fry bread, too? (Hint: It's soo worthwhile!)

This 'recipe' (can Fried Bread even be called a recipe?) is so quick and easy
that I'm adding it to a special collection of easy summer recipes
published throughout the summer of 2009.
With a free e-mail subscription, you'll never miss a one!

“Birds do it, bees do it, even educated fleas do it. Let's do it, let's fall in love.” 

~ Cole Porter

So everybody IS doing it, frying bread, that is, and loving it too.

Julia Child does it. In the new hit movie Julie & Julia, she sizzles bread in a heavy cast-iron skillet.

Mattie Ross in True Grit does it. “The ‘corn dodgers’ were balls of what I would call hot-water cornbread. … [Rooster Cogburn] sliced up some of the dodgers and fried them in grease. Fried bread! That was a new dish to me.”

Uncle Ronnie does it. “I never use a toaster anymore!”

My own dad does it. “I didn’t know anybody in the last 150 years fried bread,” he said just before wolfing down three slices.

In the last year, I do it. Several times a week, just a small slice, maybe two. The toaster gave out before Christmas, there’s no reason to replace it. Like a child prioritizing her plate, I save the bread to eat last, it’s as good as dessert, often it IS dessert.

We do it. Won’t you do it too?

SUMMER EASY:
FRIED BREAD RECIPE

Hands-on time: 5 minutes
Time to table: 10 minutes
  • Olive oil or for extra decadence, butter
  • Firm, hearty bread, sliced 1/4” – 1/3” thick

Heat the oil til shimmery on medium high in a skillet. Rub both sides of each slice in the oil. Fry each side for a couple of minutes until crispy and golden brown. Serve hot.

Nibble on a slice, closing your eyes to give thanks that you're one of the lucky people enlightened to the primal pleasure of fried bread.

NUTRITION ESTIMATE Will vary widely based on how much oil is used and how much / the kind of bread; this is based on 1 tablespoon of oil for used on four ounces of whole-grain bread split four ways: 106Cal; 4g Tot Fat; 1g Sat Fat; 0mg Cholesterol; 169mg Sodium; 14g Carb; 1g Fiber; 2g Sugar; 2g Protein; Weight Watchers 2 points

ALANNA’s TIPS This is a great way to spread one roll a long way. Just a slice or two is plenty to round out breakfast or to serve with a cup of soup or a salad for supper. Here, we’re partial to the whole-grain rolls with raisins and nuts from Whole Foods. Just one roll serves four. Slices of hearty bread from a loaf work too, just cut into halves or quarters before frying.


Kitchen Parade is written by second-generation food columnist Alanna Kellogg
and features fresh, seasonal dishes for every-day healthful eating
and occasional indulgences.
In 2009, Kitchen Parade celebrates its 50th anniversary with a special collection of my mother's recipes.
What are you 'doing' that other Kitchen Parade readers might like to 'do' too? Just send me a quick note via recipes@kitchen-parade.com.
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More Recipes Based on Bread

(hover for a description, click a photo for a recipe)
Bacon & Egg Breakfast Bake Panzanella Gashouse Eggs
~ more bread recipes ~

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I've never thought of doing this, but yum! I bet it has amazing flavor! Must try this!
 
Dianne ~ I was exactly the same way! It had just never occurred to me. Once you try it, you won't go back!
 
Alanna,
Try some other lipids too - I'm fond of duck fat, but lard is good (home-rendered of course) and there's always butter. These aren't as healthy as olive oil, but mighty good as a special occasion. Spread a little artichoke tapenade on the bread fried in duck fat.
 
That sounds delicious!
 
Actually, in the movie Julie & Julia, I believe it's Julie (the blogger) who fries the bread. Unless I'm blanking on a different scene when Julia does it too? I just remember this because I LOVED the way that bread looked just before she topped it with the tomatoes for a delicious bruschetta. Really great scene!
 
I'm not a cook. I hate to cook. But I love to eat. I have a Jewish step-son and for a treat we will pan fry (in butter) leftover challah for Saturday morning breakfast. Yum!!
 
Fried bread is quite common over here in the UK with a full English breakfast, although most places probably wouldn't use olive oil. It has always seemed really greasy to me. I do however, like the Gashouse Eggs that you posted a while back but spread butter on the bread before cooking them.
 

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Thank you for taking a moment to write! I read each and every comment, for each and every recipe. If you have a specific question, it's nearly always answered quick-quick. But I also love hearing your reactions, your curiosity, even your concerns! When you've made a recipe, I especially love to know how it turned out, what variations you made, what you'll do differently the next time. ~ Alanna