Monday, November 18, 2013

Homemade Whole Cranberry Sauce for the Slow Cooker

A reader recipe! What first attracted me to this recipe: the convenience of the slow cooker. What keeps me coming back: it fills the house with a sweet aroma of cranberries, fresh ginger and orange zest!

Great update! And now I've tried making this already-wonderful recipe with maple syrup, a natural sweetener. It works beautifully!

Homemade Whole Cranberry Sauce ♥ KitchenParade.com, the convenience of the slow cooker, the natural sweetness of maple syrup, the sweet aroma of cranberries, fresh ginger and orange zest!

Last fall, reader Karen Grosvenor responded to my complaints about slow cookers (see Easy Chicken or Turkey Tortilla Soup), suggesting her favorite slow cooker cookbook, Not Your Mother's Slow Cooker Cookbook. She even gave a head start by recommending the Overnight Steel-Cut Oatmeal (excellent!), Ratatouille, Applesauce, the Salsa Chicken (excellent!) and Easy Cheesy Ravioli Casserole, which she says, believe it or not, is better in the slow cooker than the oven.

Karen also sent along this easy way to make cranberry sauce in the slow cooker, explaining, “My mother and I found this recipe for Homemade Whole Cranberry Sauce in Parade Magazine years ago. Even those who don't like cranberry sauce like it, including children, my mother-in-law and (formerly) me."

She went on,"In theory, cranberry sauce is easy, but it always seems to take longer than I think and requires lots of stirring and asking, ‘Is it done yet?’ Now I just throw it in my slow cooker and let it go while I prepare my other Thanksgiving dishes.”

Thanks, Karen, your recipe for Homemade Cranberry Sauce recipe is a winner!

PICK THE RIGHT SLOW COOKER The size of your slow cooker matters here. I use my favorite small red slow cooker, the one that's so perfect small batches, especially for one or two. But I have the idea if you were to make this in a larger slow cooker, it could well burn quickly because of more surface area for the same volume. To counteract this, just double the recipe.

PLAYING WITH SWEETENERS I tried this recipe with Stevia and was unimpressed: the taste was “chemical-y” and it didn’t thicken, bummer. I've also made it with a single cup of sugar, the taste is great great but the sauce doesn't thicken as well.

The real excitement? Call me "delighted" that this recipe adapted so easily to maple syrup! On the first try, I used a half cup of maple syrup instead of white sugar. I really love the maple-y touch, it really works with orange and ginger. This is my new first-choice sweetener for Homemade Whole Cranberry Sauce.

Kitchen Parade is written by second-generation food columnist Alanna Kellogg and features fresh, seasonal dishes for every-day healthful eating and occasional indulgences. Do you have a favorite slow cooker recipe that other Kitchen Parade readers might like? Just send me a quick e-mail via recipes@kitchen-parade.com. How to print a Kitchen Parade recipe. Never miss a recipe! If you like this recipe, sign up for a free e-mail subscription. If you like Kitchen Parade, you're sure to like my food blog about vegetable recipes, too, A Veggie Venture. Follow Kitchen Parade on Facebook!

HOMEMADE WHOLE CRANBERRY SAUCE for the SLOW COOKER

Hands-on time: 20 minutes
Time to table: 3 hours
Makes 2-1/2 cups (made with sugar) or
2 cups (made with maple syrup),
fits a small slow cooker, double the recipe for a larger slow cooker
  • 12 ounces (340g) fresh or frozen cranberries
  • 1-1/2 cups (300g) sugar or 1/2 cup maple syrup
  • 1 tablespoon freshly grated ginger
  • 1 tablespoon orange zest (from about 2 oranges)
  • 3/4 cup (200g) fresh orange juice (from about 2 large or 4 small oranges)

Finger through the cranberries under running water, seeking out soft or shriveled or unripe berries to discard.

Combine cranberries and remaining ingredients in a smaller slow cooker. Cook on high for 2 – 2-1/2 hours, stirring occasionally. (Avoid longer, the cranberries lose their beautiful color. After cooking, the mixture will “appear” to be quite liquid but will thicken slightly once it's chilled.)

Refrigerate until ready to serve. Keeps several days, even a couple of weeks, it's great to have on hand during the holidays for odds 'n' end uses both savory and sweet.

NUTRITION INFORMATION
Made with Sugar (makes 2.5 cups) Per Two/Four Tablespoons: 31/63 Calories; 0g Tot Fat; 0g Sat Fat; 0mg Cholesterol; 0mg Sodium; 8/16g Carb; 1/2g Fiber; 6/13g Sugar; 0g Protein. WEIGHT WATCHERS POINTS WW Old Points .5/1, PointsPlus 1/2.

Made with Maple Syrup (makes 2 cups) Per Two/Four Tablespoons: 41/83 Calories; 0g Tot Fat; 0g Sat Fat; 0mg Cholesterol; 1/2mg Sodium; 11/21g Carb; 1/2g Fiber; 8/16g Sugar; 0g Protein. WEIGHT WATCHERS POINTS WW Old Points 1/1, PointsPlus 1/2.

ALANNA’s TIPS If you like, cook the cranberry sauce a day (or several days) ahead. But then again, it really makes the kitchen smell good so consider putting it in the slow cooker early Thanksgiving morning. I love how this cranberry sauce leaves the cranberries soft and juicy but still, mostly whole. Use a lemon zester for the orange zest and a large-holed rasp for the fresh ginger. The orange and ginger flavors stay in the background but somehow they make the cranberries taste more like cranberries! I make this a couple of times each year, it's just nice to have on hand! I also use it to make Pork Tenderloin with Balsamic Cranberry Sauce and Cranberry Orange Spread, a great holiday appetizer. The food blog Farm Fresh Feasts added beets and fresh ginger to make a Cranberry, Orange & Beet Salad. Creative!


This Week, Years Past 2002 - 2012

Light & Fluffy Homemade Whole-Grain Bread & Buns Perfect Whole Wheat Pumpkin Muffins Squash Puff Turnip Puff Perfect Make-Ahead Mashed Potatoes (Party Potatoes) Roasted Butternut Squash & Apple Pumpkin Bread Pudding Pumpkin Cheesecake Bars Pumpkin Pecan Pie Apple-Butter Pumpkin Pie

Last Week, Elsewhere

Bread Pudding from Sunset 44 Bistro
~ more St. Louis Restaurant Recipes ~
My Column in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Pioneer Woman's Broccoli Wild Rice Casserole
~ more Recent Recipes ~
A Veggie Venture


More Ideas for the "Cranberry Course"

(hover for a description, click a photo for a recipe)
Cranberry Chutney Cranberry Orange Relish with Fresh Ginger Fresh Jellied Cranberry Sauce with Apple

Shop Your Pantry First

(helping home cooks save money on groceries)





© Copyright Kitchen Parade 2013, 2014 & 2015



Wednesday, November 6, 2013

Homemade Butterhorns
My Iowa Grandmother’s Recipe

My Iowa grandmother's recipe for Homemade Butterhorns – some people call them Thanksgiving Crescent Rolls, yes? – made with a rich yeast dough shaped in the familiar "cornucopia" shapes that so suit a Thanksgiving table. I like baking a mix of "mini" Homemade Butterhorns for Thanksgiving dinner and larger rolls for after-dinner turkey sandwiches!

Plus, my thoughts on the book "Bread Matters" – it's up-ended many of my"truths" about bread-baking.

Homemade Butterhorns (aka Thanksgiving Crescent Rolls), my Iowa grandmother's recipe, a rich yeast dough shaped in the familiar 'cornucopia' shapes that so suit a Thanksgiving table. From Kitchen Parade.

So here’s my Big Question: What is Truth, anyway? (A Small but Pertinent Question: What in heck does truth have to do with Homemade Butterhorns? Read on.)

Once upon a time, I minored in Economics. I even considered graduate school – until someone said I would “re-learn” four years of hard slogging. In Economics, there was no Truth, you see.

And then my book club read the wonderful The Sparrow by author Maria Doria Russell. Oh! we were so certain we understood the “truth” of the story – until we read the second book, Children of God. In literature, there was more than one truth, you see.

And now to Truth & Butterhorns.

For a couple of years now, the book Bread Matters by Andrew Whitley has hammered away at my bread-baking “truths” – up-ending much of what I felt certain was, well, certain. For example, my “truth” is that bread dough is best mixed and kneaded by hand. (It’s only natural, really, given my family history, see the story in Best-Ever Oatmeal Bread.) But Whitley makes the case that a bread dough’s glutens develop better when dough is kneaded more quickly, a job for a standing mixer.

Bread Matters has me re-thinking the “truths” of bread-baking. It’s a book for experienced bread bakers, as it won’t really teach anyone “how” to make bread, and while there are recipes, its importance, I think, is in its early chapters.

GRAMMA’s BUTTERNHORNS This is my Grandmother Kellogg’s recipe, passed along by my cousin LeAnne who remembers that Gramma’s recipe came from someone else in the family. “Probably Great-grandmother Grove,” my 86-year old father says, “She was always working in the kitchen.”

Butterhorns are a “celebration” bread – that’s one made just once or twice a year for a special occasion, like Hot Cross Buns for Good Friday and Armenian Easter Bread for Easter and Pan de Muerto for Day of the Dead.

Homemade Butterhorns' cornucopia shape just suits Thanksgiving! The dough is rich and easy-easy to knead and roll out. I like to make a mix of mini rolls for dinner and some larger rolls for after-dinner sandwiches. If you can, gather people round for a roll or two as soon as they’re out of the oven, so lovely!

ALANNA’s TIPS Keep the dough a bit wet and sticky, it makes for more tender rolls. I have skipped the first rise entirely and the rolls turn out fine. This means you can mix the rolls right before bed! I do like to bake Butterhorns as close to dinnertime as possible. For Thanksgiving, that means they’re baked in that small window before the side dishes go into the oven. But hmm, since Homemade Butterhorns only bake for 10 minutes, surely it should be possible to serve them hot from the oven? I’m going to work on that this year! New Truth!

HOMEMADE BUTTERHORNS RECIPE
(THANKSGIVING CRESCENT ROLLS)

See below for step-by-step photos
Hands-on time: 25 minutes to mix, 25 minutes to roll plus occasional attention throughout
Time to table: 24 hours
Makes 24 large rolls, 32 medium rolls or 48 mini rolls
  • 1 cup whole milk
  • 1/2 cup (1 stick) salted butter
  • 3 large eggs, whisked well
  • 1/2 cup (100g) sugar
  • 2-1/2 teaspoons yeast
  • 4 cups all-purpose or bread flour, fluffed to aerate before measuring or 500g plus ½ - 1 cup more
  • 1 – 2 teaspoons table salt
  • Vegetable oil for bowl
  • Additional flour for rolling
  • Melted butter for brushing

DAY BEFORE BAKING

MIX DOUGH In a saucepan, scald the milk (to “scald” milk means to gently heat it just to the boiling point, without allowing it to boil). Remove from heat, stir in butter and let cool to lukewarm.

By hand or with an electric mixer, whisk eggs until well broken up, then add sugar and yeast. Gently blend in cooled milk mixture. A cupful at a time, add 4 cups flour and salt and blend in well. A quarter cup at a time, add more flour until a workable dough begins to form, drawing away from sides of bowl. Either in the mixer or by hand, knead for 5 minutes.

FIRST RISE Set dough aside to clean and lightly oil the bowl with vegetable oil. Put dough back in, roll inside bowl to cover the outer surface with oil (this prevents cracking as the ball of dough expands as it rises). Cover the bowl with a clean towel and place in a warm spot to rise. Let dough rise until double in size.

SECOND COLD RISE With a fist, gently deflate the dough until compact. Transfer to a refrigerator container large enough for the dough to double in size again and refrigerate overnight.

BAKING DAY

FORM ROLLS With a fist, gently deflate the dough until compact. Cut dough into three (for large rolls) or four (for medium rolls) or eight (for mini rolls) pieces weighing roughly the same. With your hands, shape each piece into a flat round.

Lightly sprinkle flour over a work surface. With a rolling pin, roll a piece into a large thin round. With a pizza cutter or a knife, cut into eight triangles. Starting at the wider end, roll each triangle. Arrange on an ungreased baking sheet, tip-side down, leaving room for rolls to rise.

LAST RISE When the baking sheet is full, cover with a clean towel and let rise in a warm place until rolls are slightly puffy.

BAKE Heat oven to 400F. Bake rolls for 10 minutes or until golden.

BRUSH Brush the center section of each roll with butter.

NUTRITION ESTIMATE Per Mini/Medium/Large Butterhorn: 78/118/157 Calories; 3/4/5g Tot Fat; 2/2/3g Sat Fat; 19/28/38mg Cholesterol; 93/140/187mg Sodium; 11/17/23g Carb; 0/1/1g Fiber; 2/4/5g Sugar; 2/3/4g Protein. WEIGHT WATCHERS POINTS WW Old Points 2/2.5/3.5 & WW Points Plus 2/3/4.

Kitchen Parade is written by second-generation food columnist Alanna Kellogg and features fresh, seasonal dishes for every-day healthful eating and occasional indulgences. Quick Suppers are Kitchen Parade favorites and feature recipes easy on the budget, the clock, the waistline and the dishwasher. Do you have a favorite family bread recipe that other Kitchen Parade readers might like? Just send me a quick e-mail via recipes@kitchen-parade.com. How to print a Kitchen Parade recipe. Never miss a recipe! If you like this recipe, sign up for a free e-mail subscription. If you like Kitchen Parade, you're sure to like my food blog about vegetable recipes, too, A Veggie Venture. Follow Kitchen Parade on Facebook!

This Week, Years Past 2002 - 2012

Mashed Potatoes & Carrots Mashed Rutabagas & Apples Flaky Tender Pie Crust How to Make Flaky Tender Pie Crust (photo tutorial) (<< readers love this!) Slow-Cooker Turkey Breast Make-Ahead Fresh Green Bean Casserole Six Thanksgiving Menus How to Dry-Brine and Roast a Whole Turkey Sausage Stuffing Pumpkin-Stuffed Lasagna Rolls

This Week, Elsewhere

Carrot Cake from
Tower Restaurant at Queeny Tower at Barnes-Jewish Hospital
~ more St. Louis Restaurant Recipes ~
My Column in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Butternut Squash Lasagna with Butternut Bechamel & Roasted Butternut Squash
~ more Recent Recipes ~
A Veggie Venture


Step-by-Step, Forming Homemade Butterhorns

(hover for a detailed description)
Dust counter with flour Deflate dough Cut dough into pieces
Shape dough pieces into flat rounds Roll into a round Cut into 8 pieces
Roll butterhorns Arrange on baking sheet, tip-side down Cover for the last rise

Uh Oh!


Homemade Butterhorns, mis-shapen, easy to prevent by placing tip-side down on the baking sheet.

Uh Oh! Always place the Butterhorns tip-side down on the baking sheet, otherwise, oops, this is what happens!


The Bread of Life: More Recipe Ideas for Thanksgiving Breads

(hover for a description, click a photo for a recipe)
Skillet Cornbread Light 'n' Fluffy Homemade Whole-Grain Bread Homemade Yeast Rolls: Ice Cream Pail Buns





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