Recipe for Roasted Butternut Squash & Apple

Such familiar ingredients (butternut squash, apples, maple syrup and warm fall spices) somehow create unexpected layers of flavor and color. One of the prettiest dishes to ever hit a table, yes?! so festive for special occasions like Thanksgiving but simple enough for weekend suppers too.

Roasted Butternut Squash & Apple

When I was first learning to cook, I had three church cookbooks, a 3x5 box for recipes clipped from newspapers and, over time, a stack of Pillsbury cookbooks, the ones from the grocery store check-out lane.

Then, as my cooking style veered toward ‘whole’ and ‘real’ ingredients, the Pillsbury-product heavy recipes no longer appealed. So I hadn’t bought a Pillsbury cookbook in years until somehow, last year’s November issue grabbed my attention. And hey! it was a nice little recipe book, with short and seasonal recipes, good pictures, a focus on eating healthfully – all in all, my kind of recipe inspiration! If you find yourself with an extra minute waiting in a grocery line, you might scan the current issue, just to see.

This squash and apple dish is the first recipe from the Pillsbury cookbook. And honestly, it caught me by surprise – the layers of flavor are just so good, that brightness of cinnamon, that smokiness of curry, the familiar bites of winter squash and apple.

It would be a hit, I think, at Thanksgiving, especially in a buffet since it’s good served both hot and at room temperature. Later, I’d serve it with ham, perhaps pork, perhaps lamb. It has a festive feel that makes it perfect for holiday tables but a Saturday night supper, too.

HOW TO CUT, PEEL & CUBE A BUTTERNUT SQUASH AND KEEP ALL TEN FINGERS — Consider this a public service announcement for it turns out, I'm not alone in approaching a butternut squash with wary eyes. They're dense and unwieldy, perhaps better left alone. No more. Just this week I posted a step-by-step photo guide to cutting up a butternut squash at A Veggie Venture. Learning the right technique is a revelation, I've been squash-crazy ever since learning, finally, how to tackle one of these guys.

Kitchen Parade is written by second-generation food columnist Alanna Kellogg and features fresh, seasonal dishes for every-day healthful eating and occasional indulgences. In 2009, Kitchen Parade celebrates its 50th anniversary with a special collection of my mother's recipes. Do you have a favorite recipe that other Kitchen Parade readers might like? Just send me a quick e-mail via recipes@kitchen-parade.com. How to print a Kitchen Parade recipe. If you like Kitchen Parade, you're sure to like my food blog about vegetable recipes, too, A Veggie Venture. Become a Kitchen Parade fan on Facebook!

RECIPE for ROASTED BUTTERNUT SQUASH & APPLE

Hands-on time: 20 minutes
Time to table: 1-1/4 hours
Makes 4 cups
    SQUASH
  • 1 butternut squash, about 1-1/2 pounds, washed well
  • 1 tablespoon butter, melted
  • 1 teaspoon curry powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • Freshly ground pepper to taste
    APPLES
  • 2 apples, cored, chopped into half-inch pieces
  • 2 tablespoons maple syrup
  • 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar (don’t skip)

Set oven to 375F. Place a glass or ceramic baking dish in the oven to preheat.

SQUASH Place the squash in the microwave for 3 minutes to soften (see TIPS). Remove the skin, seeds and membrane, then into half-inch cubes (see How to Cut, Peel & Cube a Butternut Squash). In a large bowl (see TIPS), toss the squash with remaining squash ingredients, coating the cubes well with butter and spices. Transfer to baking dish. Cover with foil and bake for 20 minutes.

APPLES Combine apples, maple syrup and balsamic vinegar. Arrange apples over the squash. Re-cover with foil, bake for another 10 minutes.

Uncover the dish, stir and bake for about another 30 minutes, stirring every 10 minutes, until the squash is fully cooked and the liquid is absorbed. Taste and adjust the seasoning. Serve immediately.

ALANNA’s TIPS Cooking the squash for just 3 minutes in the microwave softens the very outer layer just enough so that it’s much easier to slice off the ends and the skin. While it would be possible, say, to just toss the squash with the butter and spices right in the baking dish, I find that to use less fat when roasting vegetables, it’s easier to use another dish so that you can really move the pieces around, coating every last inch.
NUTRITION ESTIMATE Per Half Cup: 105Cal; 3g Tot Fat; 2g Sat Fat; 7mg Cholesterol; 295mg Sodium; 21g Carb; 3g Fiber; 11g Sugar; 1g Protein; Weight Watchers 2 points This recipe has been 'Alanna-sized' with reductions in fat and sugar and increases in no-calorie spices.

A Menu for a Fall Feast

Cranberry Orange Spread & Crackers

Tender Pork Tenderloin

~ Roasted Butternut Squash & Apple (above) ~

Celery, Date & Walnut Salad
from A Veggie Venture
with Fried Bread

Apple Cider Indian Pudding

More Favorite Winter Squash Recipes

(hover for a description, click a photo for a recipe)
Winter Stew Acorn Squash with Quinoa & Cherries Squash Puff

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Looks so good! And healthy for Thanksgiving, great way to balance out the carbs :)
 
You can buy pre-peeled, diced butternut squash, which would save even more time with this recipe. I'd still cut it into smaller, even chunks, but at least the peeling and seeding would be done for you. Looks yummy -- thanks for sharing!
 
Fantastic recipe! I made this for my soon-to-be in-laws over last Thanksgiving, and it was a huge hit with everyone.

I've even plugged it from my own weight-loss column, here.
 
To be honest, I expected to love this dish -- after all, I am a big fan of butternut squash, apples, maple syrup, curry, etc. But I found the spices overpowering, and I couldn't even taste the squash. Very disappointing.
 
Hi Elaine, So sorry that this recipe didn't work out for you, thanks for taking the time to report in. Kitchen Parade recipes are often 'spice forward' so if that's not to your taste, you might think about adjusting the spices in the future. But I'll make this again over Thanksgiving, to make sure that the squash flavor still comes through, I always want my recipes to taste like what's in them, not what's added. Thanks again!
 

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Thank you for taking a moment to write! I read each and every comment, for each and every recipe. If you have a specific question, it's nearly always answered quick-quick. But I also love hearing your reactions, your curiosity, even your concerns! When you've made a recipe, I especially love to know how it turned out, what variations you made, what you'll do differently the next time. ~ Alanna