Glöggi: Recipe for Scandinavian-Style
Hot Red Wine 'Mulled' with Winter Spices

To warm your winter world, try a glass of hot red wine 'mulled' with spices, fruit and for good luck, an almond. In Finland and Sweden, mulled wine is called 'glöggi' and 'vinglögg', because, I dare to say, for the easy way it glug-glugs down our throats.

Glöggi - Mulled Wine

Twas a magical end to a year of hard work and four-continent travel. On Christmas Day, I booked a ticket to Finland to spend New Year’s with the Finnish ‘family’ who so warmly welcomed a young exchange student into their home two decades earlier.

Hurry was important: my Finnish mother was afflicted with the scourge of Alzheimers. Already, my Finnish sister warned, “Äiti (mother) may not recognize you.”

But Äiti did recognize me, not at first, only when I attempted much-rusty Finnish conversation. The first words to emerge were the Finnish names for foods, the subject of many patient after-school kitchen lessons all those years ago. In the present, she listened closely for some minutes, then laughed out loud, incredulous. “Alu?” she said. “You’ve come back!”

Later that afternoon, my Finnish sister and I sat in the soft light of a coffee shop. We wrapped bone-cold hands around glass cups of gloggi, hot red wine fortified with spices, fruit, a touch of sugar and, for good luck, an almond. Outside in the darkness that falls early so far north, new snow muffled an already holiday-quiet city. All was well, for auld lange syne, indeed. Happy New Year’s to one, to all.

Kitchen Parade is written by second-generation food columnist Alanna Kellogg and features fresh, seasonal dishes for every-day healthful eating and occasional indulgences. In 2009, Kitchen Parade celebrates its 50th anniversary with a special collection of my mother's recipes. Do you have a favorite hot drink recipe that other Kitchen Parade readers might like? Just send me a quick e-mail via recipes@kitchen-parade.com. How to print a Kitchen Parade recipe. If you like Kitchen Parade, you're sure to like my food blog about vegetable recipes, too, A Veggie Venture. Become a Kitchen Parade fan on Facebook!

RECIPE for GLÖGGI
(Hot Red Mulled Wine)

Hands-on time: 20 minutes
Time to table: 45 minutes
Makes about 4-1/2 cups
  • 1 bottle red wine
  • 1-1/2 cups tawny port
  • 3 – 4 thin slices of fresh ginger
  • 1 cinnamon stick
  • 6 cardamom seeds
  • 1 orange, zest and juice
  • 1 lemon, zest and juice
  • 1/4 cup sugar
    TO SERVE
  • Currants
  • Whole almonds

In a saucepan, bring all ingredients except sugar just to a boil but do not allow to boil. Stir in the sugar and stir until dissolved.

If there’s time, turn off the heat and let the flavors meld for a couple of hours before serving. Gloggi may be made 24 or 48 hours before serving, just cover and refrigerate. Before serving, return just to a boil but do not allow to boil. Remove the ginger and cinnamon. If you like (I don’t bother), strain out the spices and citrus zests.

To serve, drop a few currants and an almond into each glass and serve hot.

ALANNA’s TIPS Consider a double or triple batch, mulled wine is nice to have on hand for the holidays. My Dutch oven easily handles a triple batch.

NUTRITION ESTIMATE ESTIMATE (How many calories in Mulled Wine? How many Weight Watchers points in Mulled Wine?) Per Half Cup: 123 Calories; 1g Tot Fat; 0g Sat Fat; 0mg Cholesterol; 3mg Sodium; 12g Carb; 1g Fiber; 10g Sugar; 1g Protein; Weight Watchers 2 points
Adapted from The Best of Swedish Cooking, published in 1983 and a real gem for those with Swedish heritage.

A Menu for the Winter Solstice, New Year's Eve
or a Cold Winter Night


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Thank you for taking a moment to write! I read each and every comment, for each and every recipe. If you have a specific question, it's nearly always answered quick-quick. But I also love hearing your reactions, your curiosity, even your concerns! When you've made a recipe, I especially love to know how it turned out, what variations you made, what you'll do differently the next time. ~ Alanna