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Welcome to the New 'Kitchen'!

Some cooks long for granite counters, Viking stoves and copper pots. Here at Kitchen Parade's brand-new home online, there's nothing half so fancy. But for the first time, Kitchen Parade is presented in the two-column layout for which it's expressly written -- finally!For more than two years now, I've been longing for an online version of a two-column 'kitchen' -- my writing and the recipes just make better sense when presented side by side. One web designer after another objected. I heard, "It's just not the way it's done," and "That would be really hard." Enter the magicians at Matchbox Creative, a wife & husband duo from Vancouver, Jeannette with a flair for design, Cornelius with a brilliance for code. I'm grateful, truly, for their work.So look around around. Every single recipe, even ones you've spied before, will look 'brand-new'. For example, here's the most recent column on the old site and now, here

Apple Cider Indian Pudding

Long before the leaves turn, the hunter’s moon appears and the blackbirds gather, you know fall has truly arrived when you can finally turn on the oven without first turning on the air.Before then, the days remain summer-warm with windows-open temperatures day and night.It feels reckless, wasteful even, to simultaneously cool and heat the house, even when ever so tempted by autumn’s fat knobs of roast squash and smooth ridges of baked pumpkin.So now that it’s cooled down a bit, cook squash for supper’s vegetable, then turn the oven down for an unusual variation of Indian pudding.Its history harkens to 17th-century American colonies. Traditional versions are made with cornmeal, milk and molasses but since first trying this delicious apple-cider combination a year ago, I can’t fathom anything but! ALANNA's TIPS Yellow cornmeal works well but I prefer the texture from half yellow cornmeal, half stone-ground cornmeal. Currants are slightly lower in calories and more nutritious than …

Mocha Morsels

You never know where you’ll discover a great recipe. My sister once mailed a magazine article she’d clipped. I don’t remember the article’s topic but often make the cheese gnocchi pie, a cheesy side dish, printed on the other side. The recipe for MOCHA MORSELS was published in a food magazine, no surprise there, but in an ad for a food processor. Mix up a batch of cookies in a food processor? Whatever! While I can’t imagine cooking without a Cuisinart, the hand mixer I bought for ten bucks many years ago has served well. The Maytag man should be so lonely. ALANNA's TIPS Toasting nuts in a pre-heating oven is a simple trick. The hot nuts will cause the chocolate chips to melt, slightly, an effect I like. If you don’t, let the nuts cool before adding. Except for exacting pastries, home cooks rarely need to separately sift or stir together dry ingredients. To counteract settling, do stir flour before measuring, however. Then pour the flour and the other measured dry ingredients in…

Saturday Soup

What to eat when your fridge is filled with nothing but bits of leftovers? Saturday Soup! It's my family's proven forumula for using up lots of bits of leftovers. It's rarely pretty but it's usually surprisingly tasty – and best of all, food waste drops to nil. Thanksgiving leftovers are the best! But if a week’s gone by and your fridge still holds turkey bounty, chances are, everyone’s ready to move on.SATURDAY SOUP is a terrific way to use up leftovers all year round. Make it regularly and you’ll find yourself saving tiny bites of leftovers (sometimes in a designated container in the fridge or freezer) that might otherwise go to waste.As a kid, we threw a batch together for Saturday lunch, cleaning out the fridge before Mom headed to the store to pick up the next week’s groceries. Because the leftovers changed every week, two pots rarely tasted the same, except for being both reliably delicious and completely unrepeatable! ALANNA's TIPS Bacon meat itself is opt…

Pumpkin Bread Pudding

When picturing a Thanksgiving meal, my mind’s eye moves straight to the pumpkin pie, its crust golden and flaky, the filling tawny orange flecked with spicy brown. But some years, it’s good to part with tradition! Treat your family to this luscious bread pudding, if not for Thanksgiving then before or after. While it’s a bit homely looking, you’ll be licking the dish clean!The original recipe is what makes America obese: the portions were enormous and laden with fat and sugar! Even with half the calories and a third the fat, you’ll find the revised recipe generous and rich. ALANNA's TIPS Use fresh rather than stale bread – it will more easily soak up the pumpkin-infused egg and milk mixture. If the bread is crusty, think about removing the crust before tearing into cubes. For texture contrast, top with a few toasted pecans. If you bake ahead of time, reheat the pudding before serving. The sauce can easily be made in advance, then reheated. If you’ve wanted to experiment with…